According to statistics, there are 9 different tiger species in the world, of which 3 are extinct.

Extinct tiger species include

Bali tiger (Panthera tigris balica)

Javan tiger (Panthera tigris sondaica)

Persian tiger or Caspian tiger (Panthera tigris virgata)

The 6 extant tiger species include:

Male flower tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis): 59 individuals are kept in captivity in China and are at high risk of extinction because of the relatively small number of young (6 children).

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Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae): Lives on the island of Sumatra – Indonesia. Wild populations exist in numbers from 400 to 500 animals in 5 national parks on the island.

Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica): Also known as the Amur tiger, the Manchu tiger. The population of this species is about 540 and exists in Russia and Northeast China.

Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni): The number of individuals in the world is about 600-800 and occurs mainly in the Malay peninsula.

Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti): The population of this species is estimated at about 1,200 – 1,800 individuals. Distributed mainly in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, China, Thailand, Malaysia and Myanmar.

Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris): The number of species is about 2,000 scattered in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Bhutan and China.

Thus, despite being a fierce animal, the number of tigers in the world is not much and faces the risk of being threatened.

Size

There are many tiger breeds in the world, depending on the geographical location and climatic environment, the size is different. The average male tiger is 2.6 to 3.3 m long and weighs from 150 to 360 kg. Female tigers average 2.3 to 2.75m long, average weight from 100 to 160kg.

The largest tiger species in the world is the Siberian tiger with a length of up to 3.5m and a weight of 360kg. The smallest tiger species in the world is the Sumatran tiger with a length of about 2.6m and an average weight of 75 to 140kg.

Tigers in general have long, slender bodies for easy movement and hunting.